Intervention

in·ter·ven·tion

in(t)ərˈven(t)SH(ə)n/

n.noun

An intervention is the process of intervening, usually referring to negative behaviors. Interventions are a powerful and useful tool for loved ones of an addict or substance abusing individual.

Families and friends of  addicted loved ones orchestrate most interventions. This group of family and friends that stage the intervention, typically do so by gathering in an open room, sometimes creating a circular shape around the individual. Interventions such as these, are usually planned and executed unbeknownst to the person who is suffering from addiction. The mission of the intervention is to provide the addicted individual with knowledge of his/her loved ones' worries as to how their particular addiction may negatively, and almost certainly, affect their life. Additionally, loved ones of the addict will take turns in sharing their concerns, how much they love the addicted person, and how their harmful habit is personally affecting the individual loved one.

Interventions, although a useful tool in attempting to reach struggling and addicted persons, is not always successful in truly reaching the afflicted individual. However, if the intervention is, in fact, unable to encourage the habitually struggling person, loved ones should not be deterred in their hopes of helping their addicted family member or friend in achieving permanent recovery.